Sceloporus bimaculosus
Twin-Spotted Spiny Lizard


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Range:
Other Names: Desert Spiny Lizard
Description: These are relatively large, rather stocky, spotted, and generally yellowish to grayish-brown lizards. Males (121 mm) get larger than females (103 mm). Scales are strongly keeled. There is a black collar around the neck.
Similar Species: The divided supraoculars; broad, black, white-bordered collar; and contrasting black and white tail bands distinguish Texas and New Mexico Crevice Spiny Lizards (Sceloporus poinsettii) from S. bimaculosis. Twin-spotted Spiny Lizards differ from Sonoran Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus clarkii clarkii) in having distinct paravertebral rows of dark brown blotches on the back, and black-streaked limbs (instead of narrow dark crossbands on the forearms), while adult females lacking both blue throats and blue, black bordered ventrolateral patches on the belly. Adult male Purple-backed Spiny Lizards (Sceloporus magister magister) have a black or deep-purple middorsal stripe (about 4.5-5 scales wide) bordered by light stripes.
Venom: None
Habitat: Prefers rocky desert landscapes
Behavior: Diurnal, loves to bask. Males can get territorial.
Hibernation: Hibernates during the cold months.
Reproduction: Lays an average of 9 eggs per clutch.
Diet: Large insects and other arthropods.

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